Maddox & Gerock


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Making the most of time spent with your noncustodial child

Research suggests that children fare better when both of their parents are involved in their lives, so if you are a noncustodial parent, know that even spending short amounts of time with your child can prove beneficial. Even if you do not see your son or daughter as much as you might like, those weekends, spring break trips and extended summer visits add up, and they can help the two of you cement a strong bond that even geography cannot break.

Spending time with a child you do not typically live with can prove challenging, however, as the two of you, and possibly other family members, adjust to new rules, new sleeping arrangements and so on. Utilizing these tips can help you make the most out of your visit with your son or daughter, improving your relationship while boosting his or her overall well-being. So, next time your child comes for a visit, try to:

Avoid overspending

At the end of the day, these visits are all about developing the bond between you and your child, and you do not have to shell out your life savings to do so. While it can prove tempting to “spoil” a child you only see so often, make sure that spending quality time together is your primary goal.

Avoid badmouthing your child’s other parent

If your child already has reservations about leaving his or her primary home, you badmouthing your child’s other parent will only worsen the situation. Instead, encourage communications between your child and the other parent during the visit, as doing so may make your child feel more comfortable making desired contact with mom or dad without having to worry about hurting your feelings.

Set clear boundaries

If you have other children living in your home and your noncustodial child visits, make sure everyone is held to the same standards in terms of rules. Additionally, if you have since remarried or have a new partner or fiancé living with you, make sure that you, and not this person, take on disciplinary duties.

By setting clear boundaries, avoiding overspending and taking strides not to badmouth your son or daughter’s other parent, you can increase your odds of an enjoyable, low-stress visit with your child.

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Maddox & Gerock, P.C.
8111 Gatehouse Road
Suite 410
Falls Church, VA 22042
Phone: 703-883-8035
Fax: 703-356-6120
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